Events

Designing for Additive Manufacturing Course

 

20th & 21st August | 8:30 am - 4 pm | Callaghan Innovation, 69 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt. 

Tickets are limited. Only 15 spaces available.  Register here

 

Additive Manufacturing (AM) or 3D printing can transform R&D timelines and support significant improvements in product design and manufacturing costs.But to realise these benefits you need to understand how to design for AM.d

The course is hosted by AddLab – Callaghan Innovation’s world-class 3D printing lab – and led by one of the industry’s best, Olaf Diegel, Professor of Additive Manufacturing and Head of Creative Design and Additive Manufacturing Lab at the University of Auckland. 

 

This two-day course is limited to 15 seats - for $495+GST pp - and covers:

  • State of the Additive Manufacturing (AM) industry
  • Introduction to Designing for Additive Manufacturing
  • An AM design optimisation exercise
  • Designing topology - optimised parts
  • The economics of AM
  • Re-designing a company part
  • Specific issues and guidelines for polymers
  • Applications of AM
  • Future insights with AM

 

What’s included? 

  • An opportunity to come through the AddLab and get a Gracefield Innovation Quarter tour before/after the course dates.
  • Access to our Selective Laser Sintering Nylon machine, and ProX DMP 320 Aluminium machine.
  • Access to Sprint and 3DxPert among other CAD and 3D print prep programs.
  • Catered morning and afternoon teas, and lunches both days.

 

Who should attend?

Design engineers, design managers, supervisors, manufacturing engineers – with particular relevance for team members who need to learn how to design for additive manufacturing in order to get the best value out of the processes. To get the most out of this course, it is recommended that two people who generally work together should attend, be it two design engineers or one design engineer and one manager.

  

Speaker/facilitator

Olaf Diegel, Professor of Additive Manufacturing and Head of Creative Design and Additive Manufacturing Lab, is heavily involved in all aspects of product development and is widely published in the areas of additive manufacturing (AM) and rapid product development. He is a principal author of the annual Wohler’s Report and his current research focus and expertise is in design for AM.

 

We hope you can join us. To attend please register here. 

 

Some extra information about the course:

Many industries approach additive manufacturing (AM) as a drop-in replacement for conventional manufacturing technologies. This approach, however, does not fully utilize the unique possibilities that additive processes offer. This course attempts to impart some practical guidance on how to design parts to gain the maximum benefit from what AM can offer. Additive manufacturing technologies are a godsend to innovation as they allow designers and inventors to quickly test out ideas to see if they work. For over thirty years, AM has been extensively used as a rapid prototyping technology. AM also removes some of the traditional manufacturing constraints that have become a barrier to creativity, and allow users to get real products to market without the normally high costs that can become a barrier to innovation.

When using the technologies for manufacturing, however, it should be noted that AM does not remove all manufacturing restrictions. It, instead, replaces them with a different set of design considerations that designers must take into account if they wish to successfully use the technologies to add value to their products. Otherwise AM can easily become a slow and uneconomical way of manufacturing products or parts. 

It is also of great importance to understand that, despite much of the marketing hype over the past few decades, AM is not an “easy” technology that can make absolutely anything. It requires a good understanding of the different technologies and how to design for them. In fact, printing parts in metal, for example, can be downright hard, and the use of AM to manufacture metal parts should only be considered if the process truly adds value to the product. 

Register here

 

 

 

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